Friday, May 18, 2012

Sweden: population increase of over 5% in 8 years, majority of that 5% are Muslims

Delayed self-destruction is now dismantling Swedish culture, and it may be too late to save it.  We in America should be taking a lesson as well as helping to stave off the looming take-over by Islam, but with Obama at the helm, promoting Islam as just another religion that can live in harmony with others there is little chance.

God bless Sweden and its beleaguered people.

From Jihad Watch May 18 by Nicolai Sennels

Report: Sweden's population is "skyrocketing" because of Muslim immigration. Shocking 5.6 percent population increase in only 8 years.

Report: Sweden's population is "skyrocketing" because of Muslim immigration. Shocking 5.6 percent population increase in only 8 years.

Immigration. Sweden's population now numbers 9.5 million people. It was only eight years ago that the figure reached 9 million. Much of the population growth is due to family reunification for refugees who have obtained asylum. The population in Sweden has skyrocketed in recent years. Last week the Swedish population topped 9.5 million. Since August 2004, the population increased by 500,000. At the same time there has been a drastic demographic change in the composition of the population. The birth surplus for the period 2004-11 was, according National Swedish bureau of Statistics, Statistika Centralbyrån, approx. 137,000, of which mothers born in non-Western countries accounted for about 22,000 births. The rest of the increase in population is mainly due to immigration from non-Western countries, asylum seekers and family reunification from countries like Afghanistan, Iraq and Somalia. Labour migration represents only a small part of the increase in this period. Working immigrants from around the world apart from the north were about 50,000 from 2004-2011. The number of permits to one of three forms of refugee status from 2004-11 amounted to almost 50,000, while the number of family reunifications was around 250,000. And the growth continues, especially from Somalia. This is because of a ruling in January from the Swedish Migration Court. The ruling means that it has become much easier for family members who find it difficult to prove their identity to be reunited with someone who is already in Sweden and has been granted asylum.
The decision affects not only Somalis, but in Somalia thousands of family members are already waiting to travel to Sweden, an article published by the Parliament states. The ruling thus annulled a decision a few years ago that put an end to family reunification for people whose identity could not be documented.
A passport can be difficult to obtain in the collapsed state of Somalia, and therefore the Migration Court reversed its decision in January. (Incidentally, according to the immigration authorities, Migrationsverket, in 2009 only 16 percent of asylum seekers carried any identity papers, and in only five percent of the cases was it a passport).
The expected large number of family reunifications has made the Swedish Migration Board apply for additional funding for administration, etc. This year it is applying for an additional 170 million Swedish kroner (24 million USD). It has applied for 341 million dollars for 2013-2014 (49 million USD). Migrationsverket total costs in 2012, including accommodation and food in the pre-asylum phase, is approx. 9 billion Swedish kroner (1.4 billion USD). In its latest Migrationsverket estimates, due to the new ruling of the Migration Court the number of family reunions in 2012 will increase by 18,500 and by 12,000 in 2013.
The total estimate for 2012 is 59,500 family reunions and 53,000 in 2013, which amounts to 112,500 family reunions 2012-2013.

Migrationsverket also expects, moreover, that the number of asylum seekers will increase as a consequence of the new rules. Migrationsverket expects that the milder requirements for identity papers will motivate more asylum seekers to go to Sweden because they know that it is possible for the rest of the family to follow if they are granted permanent residency.
Migrationsverket has increased its estimate of expected asylum seekers by 2,000. It now forecasts that 31,000 people will seek asylum in Sweden, both in 2012 and 2013, which amounts to 62,000 in two years. In 2011 29,600 people applied for asylum in Sweden, which makes Sweden (with its relatively small population) the fifth most popular country in the world among asylum seekers.
Altogether Migrationsverket expects approx. 175,000 new asylum seekers and family reunifications in the years 2012-2013. It is only a small proportion who are granted asylum.
A special phenomenon is the large number of unaccompanied refugee children travelling to Sweden. In 2010 and 2011 Sweden received a total of 5,050 young people who came to Europe. The largest group came from Afghanistan, followed by Somalia and Iraq. Britain, which receives the second largest number of unaccompanied refugee children, had 2,641 applicants, while Belgium had 1,941.

The figure last year was 2,657 in Sweden, of whom most were granted asylum. Subsequently they will be able to get family members to Sweden by using the family reunification rules.

In Denmark, approx. 160 unaccompanied children and adolescents under 18 years old were granted residence in 2011. In Finland, 150 unaccompanied children applied for asylum, which was half as many as in 2010.

Migrationsverket's expectation is that in 2012, 3,200 unaccompanied children and adolescents will arrive in Sweden, compared to, as mentioned, 2,657 in 2011.
The many unaccompanied children, mostly boys aged 15 to - allegedly - 17 years old, are causing problems for the Minister of Migration Tobias Billström (Conservative), because some municipalities have begun to refuse to receive more, although they are quite well paid from the state for each child they receive. The Minister of Migration therefore threatens to force municipalities to accept the young asylum seekers.

If they are under 18 years old, they have the right to live in a special home for young people, and they are entitled to a guardian. Many, however, seem to be over 18 years old, but Migrationverket's employees more or less have to take at face value what the unaccompanied children and young people themselves are saying.

Tobias Billström is now investigating how Denmark, Norway and Finland handle the problems with determining asylum seekers' age. He is quoted as saying that he would like to have joint Nordic procedures to determine the age of young asylum seekers. Denmark uses X-ray photos of the wrist and control of dental status. In 2009, 120 such studies were conducted in Denmark, and in 73 percent of the cases, the conclusion was that the person were older than 17 years. About the same figure is found in Norway and Finland in the cases where there has been age-studies.

According to a recent report by National Audit Office, Migrationsverket pays up to 16,000 Swedish kroner (2,300 USD) per person for each day an unaccompanied child asylum seeker lives in Sweden, including food and staffing, to municipalities that accept children.
There is much more, read it all

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